The Art of
Artworking a Logo

Logos are everywhere. I can guarantee that wherever you are reading this – you can see several logos around you. At first glance you might see one or two – but keep looking – how many can you really see?

As I write this at home – at my desk – I stopped counting when I reached 40 unique logos (not including multiples of the same logo) and there are many more. They are as diverse as my Apple MacBook Pro, a Panasonic vinyl record player, a Stanley screwdriver, a little bottle of Loctite super glue, a Sharpie pen and over 100 Coca-Cola bottles and collectibles (yes… I collect international Coca-Cola ‘hobble-skirt’ bottles).

Why did I list some of the items I can see? Because as I listed them – you can imagine what they look like –because I put a brand name to them. Why is that important? Because brands are important – it’s what makes them stand out. Or as Marks & Spencer put it “… this is not just food, this is M&S food”.

So… what is a ‘brand’?
A ‘brand’ is much more than just a logo. Your brand is how your business is perceived – mainly by your customers, your suppliers, your competitors and even your staff.

So… how is your business perceived?
Is your business reliable? Is it dependable? Is it liked by your customers, your suppliers and your staff? Is it on top of its game? Is it in front of its competitors? Is it doing things that others can only dream of?

So… what has a logo got to do with your brand?
If the answer to the previous list of questions are yes – then a well designed and thought out logo is only going to help reinforce your brand message to the outside world. It’s a peg to hang your hat on – so to speak. It’s a visual representation of your brand – it identifies the business, product or person.

Take two of the largest brands in the world – Coca-Cola and Apple. Both of their logos speak volumes. When you see their logos on their products – you know exactly what you are going to get. Why? Because their logos conjure up feelings and emotions based on years of being reliable, dependable, liked by their customers, suppliers and staff, on top of their game, in front of their competitors and doing things that others can only dream of.

So… have Cornell Studios any experience designing a new logo?
Over the years – Cornell Studios have designed many logos, for many companies, from many different areas of business – and each logo is unique to each client.

But this year we were asked to design a logo that would help our very successful client take his brand to a new level. Well – it’s not everyday you have the opportunity to design a logo for a Three-Time British Touring Car Champion.

Not that we were giving Colin Turkington special treatment – we treat all of our clients as special – but Colin’s new logo was going to be seen by his many followers on his new website (we designed and built that too), on Twitter, on Instagram and more importantly on TV. Like all the logos we design – we had to make sure this one was as well built and looked as good as Colin’s new 2019 BMW 330i M Sport BTCC racing car. What a challenge!

So… what is The Art of Artworking a Logo?
Just as Colin’s new BMW doesn’t just roll out of the garage on race day – because an engineer went down to their local Bavarian garage and purchased a car the night before – so a logo doesn’t just appear out of thin air because a designer sketched an idea on the back of a napkin. A lot of thought and research goes into preparing a logo. Of course ideas sometimes do start at a basic level – but they are built upon, crafted, refined and after being approved by their new potential owner – are constructed with precision – like the race car.

I’m not going to elaborate on the design process – mainly because I’m not a full-on Graphic Designer. I’m what is know as a Creative Artworker – or what was previously known in the industry as a Finished Artist. The Creative Artworker is not the most glamorous of jobs in the design studio, but getting your final artwork right is crucial to any branding project – especially for a new logo.

In short – I pull the design apart and rebuild it from scratch, paying particular attention to typography, making sure things line up properly and that, in this case, the corner radii (the plural of radius) are considered and accurate.

Rather than waffle on too much more – I thought it was easier to show you the building process as a short animation. (Expand to fullscreen to understand the detail)